Review: Garmin Virb Ultra 30 SCENE STEALER

Review: Garmin Virb Ultra 30 SCENE STEALER
MUST BE ACTION cam season again. The recent Yi 4K camera—which is about as capable as a GoPro Hero4 Black for only half the price—really impressed me.

Review: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF7

Review: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF7
The micro four-thirds camera market has matured greatly since the standard was launched seven years ago by Olympus and Panasonic. Starting the first Pen cameras (Olympus) and the first G-series shooters (Panasonic), we’ve seen each successive model inching closer to the ideal promised by the new system

THE NEW FUJIFILM X70

THE NEW FUJIFILM X70
THE NEW FUJIFILM X70 compact camera was announced at the same time as the larger and more powerful X-Pro2. I reviewed that X-Pro2 last month, and it’s truly excellent. But looking at both cameras born on that same day, in many ways it’s the smaller, less expensive, and less “pro” X70 that’s the more interesting camera

Canon’s 5D Mark IV Is Here, With 4K Capability And Improved Autofocus

Canon’s 5D Mark IV Is Here, With 4K Capability And Improved Autofocus
LOOK IN THE hands of a pro photographer or videographer at a live event or a wedding, and you’ll frequently see them holding a Canon EOS 5D Mark III. The full-frame mainstay is a tool of choice for a number of reasons: top-grade performance, superb photo and video quality, deep controls, and a big sensor that excels in low light.

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Lomography Lomo’Instant Automat camera launches on Kickstarter

Anish Samuel



Lomography has launched the Lomo’Instant Automat camera on Kickstarter, where it has already exceeded its $100k funding goal with 34 days remaining in the campaign. The Lomo’Instant Automat is, according to Lomography, an instant camera with two modes: an Automatic Mode that automatically adjusts shutter speed, aperture, and flash output, and Bulb Mode for long exposure shots up to 30 seconds in length.
Lomography describes the Lomo’Instant Automat as ‘small, yet mighty,’ able to shoot in a variety of situations including low-light environments. The camera features a built-in lens with a focal length equivalent of 35mm, a remote control lens cap, a dedicated exposure compensation button, the ability to enable and disable the flash, support for multiple exposures, and an LED exposure counter to track how much film is remaining.
The camera will be available in four colors – red, black, white, and yellow – and is compatible with a wide-angle lens, fisheye lens, ‘close-up’ lens, and interchangeable color gels. Says Lomography, a ‘nifty box’ of goodies with things like magnet stickers and photo clips are included with every camera.

Fujifilm X-A3 arrives with new sensor and touchscreen in tow

Anish Samuel


Fujifilm has announced its X-A3 entry-level mirrorless camera. Unlike other X-series cameras, its 24MP sensor uses a traditional Bayer color filter, rather than X-Trans. The standard ISO range is 200-6400, which can expand to 100-25,600 if needed.
The autofocus system offers 49 points in single AF mode and 77 points in the wide/tracking modes, but it lacks on-sensor phase detection like more expensive Fujifilm cameras. Also added is the ability to link metering and AF areas.
The camera has a 3" LCD that flips upward by 180 degrees, and selfies can be taken using the command dial on the back of the camera, which gives you a firmer grip on the camera. The LCD is touch-enabled and includes the usual bells-and-whistles that come along with it, plus a new 'touch zoom' feature.
The X-A3 has many of Fujifilm's Film Simulation modes, including Pro Neg.Hi, Pro Neg.Std, and Classic Chrome, but lacks the new ACROS mode found on its higher-end models. Full HD video is supported at 60p and 24p. Wi-Fi is also built-in.
The X-A3 will come bundled with the XC 16-50mm F3.5-5.6 OIS II lens in you choice of three colors: silver, brown or pink. It will be available in October at a price of $599.

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

DJI Osmo+ gimbal for iPhone offers more bang for the same buck

Anish Samuel


DJI, best known for making the best consumer drones around, also make a pretty spectacular Osmo gimbal for use with iPhone. Today, they’re updating it with digital zoom.
The Osmo+ keeps everything we like about the original, but adds a 7x zoom feature (3.5x optical, 2x digital). DJI says its focal length is 22mm to 77mm, and the digital zoom is lossless when shooting in 1080p.

Review: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF7 THE LITTLE PICTURE

Anish Samuel

The micro four-thirds camera market has matured greatly since the standard was launched seven years ago by Olympus and Panasonic. Starting the first Pen cameras (Olympus) and the first G-series shooters (Panasonic), we’ve seen each successive model inching closer to the ideal promised by the new system: a compact, mirrorless design with interchangeable lenses and full manual controls.
Of course, as you keep making your cameras smaller, the tradeoffs grow larger, and things like optics, control layouts, and screen size suffer. So it’s remarkable that Panasonic has created a camera so small with so few tradeoffs as the new GF7 ($460). It takes great images, and even though it’s very small, you can mount all manner of lenses on it—new, legacy, and adapted. It has all the Wi-Fi features for beaming photos to your phone. Battery performance lags (tiny camera, tiny battery), but I can still recommended it. It even has something for the kids: the LCD on the back flips up vertically and spins around, and some special software fires the shutter automatically so you can (yep) take selfies.
The GF7 is a little different than recent GF models. It has a blocky style that has more in common with Panasonic’s GM line of ultra-compact micro four-thirds cameras than with the GF offerings. The GF7 eschews the anonymous black body with round corners of its predecessors in favor of a cleaner, almost retro look. It’s reminiscent of one of my all time favorite cameras, the original GF1.
However, where the GF1 was very much a photo-enthusiast camera, aimed at those who wanted DSLR features in a more portable body, the GF7 is targeted more at those just looking to step up from point-and-shoot and cellphone cameras.
The design is quite handsome, but the blocky, solid-looking case you see in product shots makes it easy to overlook how diminutive the GF7 is. It fits in my palm with room to spare. It is slightly larger than the GM5, which remains the smallest micro four-thirds body out there, but not by much. It’s so tiny that if you swap the 12-32mm kit lens for a telephoto like Panasonic’s 45-200mm, things start to look comical.

REVIEW : FUJI FILM

Anish Samuel



THE NEW FUJIFILM X70 compact camera was announced at the same time as the larger and more powerful X-Pro2. I reviewed that X-Pro2 last month, and it’s truly excellent. But looking at both cameras born on that same day, in many ways it’s the smaller, less expensive, and less “pro” X70 that’s the more interesting camera

It’s FujiFilm’s smallest compact shooter yet—so small it slips easily into a pocket. But that size is deceptive. This is a powerful camera with the same 16.3-megapixel APS-C size X-Trans CMOS II sensor you’ll find in the rest of FujiFilm’s X series. Having experimented with most of themicro four thirds compacts and the newer offerings likePanasonic’s LX100, I can say without hesitation that the X70 delivers the highest quality image in the smallest package of anything in this siz

Review: Garmin Virb Ultra 30 SCENE STEALER

Anish Samuel




MUST BE ACTION cam season again. The recent Yi 4K camera—which is about as capable as a GoPro Hero4 Black for only half the price—really impressed me. While we’re all waiting to see how 800-pound gorilla GoPro will respond to that threat, Garmin has stepped into the game. Clearly, the company is swinging for the fences.

The Virb Ultra 30 is the latest in Garmin’s Virb line of action sports accessories. There have been Virb-branded action cameras before, but the Ultra 30 represents a thorough rethink. It’s Garmin’s attempt at a kitchen-sink style, high-end action camera, and for the most part it really succeeds. Its resolution and speed reach up to 4K at 30 frames per second, or 1080p at 120fps, just like GoPro’s Hero4 Black. In fact it looks almost identical to a GoPro. Like the Yi 4K (another GoPro dead ringer) it also has a touchscreen on the back—something which the Hero4 Black lacks, but the mid-tier Silver edition has.
Remarkably, you can continue using the touchscreen even with its case on, which is waterproof to 133 feet. But that’s not the most notable thing about the case; Garmin specially designed a mic port for the waterproof case, and you may not believe it, but the sound is just as clear with the case on as it is with the case off. Crazy, I know, but watch the video comparison and you’ll see what I mean. It’s totally unprecedented in the arena of action cams, and its audio quality blows the doors off everything else.
Another terrific idea Garmin has implemented is voice control. You alert it by saying “OK Garmin…” and then “start recording,” “stop recording,” “take a photo,” or “remember that” (to add a tag to that part of the video). I tested it thoroughly while mountain biking some singletrack in the badlands of North Dakota, and I quickly grew to love the feature for one very important reason: It meant I didn’t have to take my hands off the handlebars. It’s always the dodgiest moments that you want to capture, which are the exact moments you really shouldn’t be letting go. Obviously, this applies to many different sports. It certainly doesn’t work perfectly, and your videos will always end with “OK Garmin, stop recording,” but true hands-free control is a major advantage.

Review: Sony Cyber-shot RX100 III

Anish Samuel



Sony’s Cyber-shot RX series is just two years old, but it already has a strong heritage. When the first RX100 debuted in 2012, many reviewers heralded it as the best pocket camera ever made. The RX100 III is even better. It has a brighter lens, an eye-level viewfinder, better-looking video, and better low-light performance. It comes at a price, and that price is $800.
The big question is whether the RX100 III’s extra features are worth a few hundred more dollars than its predecessors, which are now its main competitors. It really depends on your shooting style and your video needs. The new camera is more similar to the RX100 II, which has a similar tilting LCD screen, the same Wi-Fi/NFC capabilities, and the same low-light-optimized sensor. The RX100 II now costs $650, while the original RX100 sells for $500 or less. They’re both top-shelf compact cameras, and they offer slightly different traits than this new one.
You’re starting with the same rock-solid foundation, though. As has always been the case with the RX compact cameras, the secret sauce is the sensor. This camera fits inside your pants pocket with ease, and its 1-inch-type sensor is massive within that context. Size matters here: The image quality for a pocket camera is mind-boggling, with very good performance in dark settings and shallow depth of field that rivals mirrorless and APS-C cameras.
Just like its forebears, the RX100 III has a fast F1.8 lens at its widest angle setting, manual exposure controls, a lens-barrel control ring, and—perhaps its most important trait—usability that will please both novices and more-experienced shooters. The RX100 III is quick to autofocus—fast enough to shoot at 3fps with AF enabled (or 10fps without)—and the control ring is a wonderful tool for manual focusing. If you’ve used any RX100 camera, you’ll feel at home behind the controls of the RX100 III.
From there, things venture outside of familiar territory for the RX100 series. For instance, the new camera has a shorter optical zoom—2.9X as compared to the 3.6X zoom of previous editions—but the lens gains ground in other ways. It has wider-angle coverage than its predecessors (24mm vs. 28mm), and its aperture stays wider through that zoom range. At 70mm telephoto, the maximum aperture is F2.8; at the same focal length, the maximum aperture was F4.0 in previous RX100 cameras. The extra speed is nice, but it comes at the expense of sawing off the best focal lengths for portraits.
The marquee addition is an eye-level OLED viewfinder with a resolution of 1.4 million dots. I receive a ton of emails lamenting the disappearance of eye-level viewfinders on compact cameras, so it will be a huge draw for some. In an impressive feat of engineering and/or magic, Sony added it without taking up any surface space. It does add bulk to the camera, however, as the RX100 III is a bit fatter and heavier than the previous generations. It also loses the hot shoe found in the RX100 II.
The viewfinder pops up out of the top left corner when you slide a switch on the side of the camera, and doing that also powers the camera on or off. After it pops up, you slide the eyepiece out so that it’s flush with the back of the camera. There’s a diopter-adjustment lever on top of the eyepiece, and a proximity sensor turns it on as you hold it to your eye. Once you move your eye from the EVF, the 3-inch LCD turns on.
It works very nicely for what it is, just as long as you don’t want to pop the EVF back into the camera without shutting everything off completely. You can leave the EVF up without draining battery due to its proximity sensor, but as soon as you click it back into the body, it powers the camera off. You’re also better off favoring your right eye. When you use your left eye, your nose can smudge up the RX100 III’s 3-inch display.
You can tilt that LCD to adjust it just like you could on the RX100 II, but there isn’t a position where it’s entirely out of your nose’s way when you use the EVF. The two-hinge LCD folds all the way up, facing forward if you need it for selfies. It also tilts downward at about a 45-degree angle to help with overhead shots.

Garmin’s new 4K action camera has 3-axis image stabilization and voice control

Anish Samuel


Garmin has announced a completely redesigned version of its Virb action camera. It’s called the Virb Ultra 30, and it packs a number of features that are rare and even unique in the action camera space, like 3-axis optical image stabilization, voice controls, and some limited live-streaming capabilities. And, of course, it shoots 4K UHD video. The Virb Ultra 30 is available starting today for $499 on Garmin’s website.
Much like its former navigation tech rival TomTom, Garmin has shifted in recent years to other markets like fitness trackers and action cameras. While Garmin is not necessarily a household name when it comes to cameras, the last version of the Virb, released in early 2015, was a really good camera that held its own against the competition from GoPro and Sony. The thing is, GoPro and Sony have laid fairly low ever since then. GoPro hasn’t released a flagship camera since the fall of 2014, and Sony’s 4K Action Cam is far from perfect.
The new Virb Ultra 30 is a clear shot across the bows of that competition. Garmin has taken the best things about the previous Virb — like the ability to capture and overlay data like speed or altitude onto your footage — and translated those features into a new camera the size of a Hero 4, all while adding in new functionality. I’ve been testing a Virb Ultra 30 for the last few days, and it’s already clear that it has a chance to help set a new bar for what action cameras are capable of.
The biggest addition is the electronic 3-axis image stabilization. This isn’t the same as the digital image stabilization found on Sony’s action cams — though the Virb does have that as an option. Nothing is worse than shooting crazy (or even mundane, really) action only to have the footage turn out too shaky to decipher. But Garmin has gone a long way toward solving it with the Virb Ultra 30’s stabilization. It works in almost every mode, too, like 4K, and at 1080p up to 60 frames per second. It will drain the battery faster (about an hour as opposed to closer to two hours without it), but with the stabilization on you can hand-hold this camera and come away with smooth footage. That’s essentially impossible with other action cameras.
THE STABILIZATION LETS YOU GET AWAY WITH HAND-HOLDING THE CAMERA
There is definitely a tolerance, as is the case with any stabilization. If the camera shakes a little too much, the stabilized footage will take on a sort of "jelly" effect. But if the camera is relatively steady — which it should be when you have it mounted somewhere — the benefit of the stabilization can be huge.

Canon’s 5D Mark IV Is Here, With 4K Capability and Improved Autofocus

Anish Samuel



LOOK IN THE hands of a pro photographer or videographer at a live event or a wedding, and you’ll frequently see them holding a Canon EOS 5D Mark III. The full-frame mainstay is a tool of choice for a number of reasons: top-grade performance, superb photo and video quality, deep controls, and a big sensor that excels in low light.
The only “problem” with the 5D Mark III is that it came out in early 2012. While cameras—especially pro models—generally retain their value longer than other forms of technology, many features have become the norm since then. Autofocus systems have improved drastically in recent years. 4K video is solidly mainstream. Built-in wireless features are common.
The new Canon EOS 5D Mark IV addresses many of those recent expectations, and given the high marks given to of past 5D models, the new version should become the new omnipresent pro DSLR. It’s the first model in the 5D series with Canon’s insanely fast “Dual Pixel AF” technology, which uses phase-detection photosites on each pixel of the sensor. Staying locked on a moving subject fluidly while capturing video or shooting continuously should be much easier.

               

  Its 3.2-inch rear LCD display is now a touchscreen, which will help you lock in on subjects with a simple screen tap. And this new camera gets a brand-new feature from Canon, dubbed “Dual Pixel RAW,” which expands the powers of its unique sensor. Like a more-limited version of Lytro, you can tweak an image’s focal point ever so slightly after you take it.
The fast continuous focus features are a huge bonus for videographers. It’s the first camera in the 5D series to shoot 4K video, capturing 4096×2160 footage at 24p or 30p. But it also shoots HDR video, albeit at a maximum resolution and frame rate of 1080p/30fps.
Other upgrades include higher-resolution images (30 megapixels versus the Mark III’s 22 megapixels); a slightly faster continuous-shooting speed (7fps versus 6fps); and Wi-Fi, NFC, and GPS capabilities built right in. The ISO range remains the same, spanning from 50 to 102,400, and the camera still has one Compact Flash and one SD/SDHC/SDXC slot.
Pro cameras aren’t cheap, especially ones with the 5D Mark IV’s skill set. Due in September, it’ll set you back $3,500 for the body only. Your old lenses should all transfer over without any problems, but there are also new lenses and kit packages to choose from.

Our Team

  • Syed Faizan AliMaster / Computers
  • Syed Faizan AliMaster / Computers
  • Syed Faizan AliMaster / Computers
  • Syed Faizan AliMaster / Computers
  • Syed Faizan AliMaster / Computers
  • Syed Faizan AliMaster / Computers